Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

 Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.  Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.  The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.  The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.  Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.

Construction of a new house on virgin countryside is anathema to current British Planning Policy. However, a particular clause, PPS7, nicknamed “Gummer’s Law”, provides for the possibility that an exceptionally eco-friendly project of unequivocal architectural merit could be granted permission in a rural setting.

Our client, a long-time resident of a Grade-II* listed Regency house in Essex, came to us to explore his vision for building such a unique dwelling. Inspired by the local East Anglian vernacular, and by the architecture that it spawned in the New World, we are developing a design for an autonomous, sustainable timber-built house.

The house will be a contemporary interpretation of the Essex vernacular, drawing inspiration from the Anglian tradition of timber-frame construction that has come to symbolise the rural architecture of New England.

The Thousand Trees House will nestle into its wooded setting, a blend of mature & developing woodland, and an artificial extension of the existing tree line.

Its form is derived from the topography of the working wooded pit, amplifying the slopes and curves of the excavation and merging with the growing trees. The sculpted curves of the roof trace and amplify these different contours. The house’s form is not willfully organic: it is an extension and amplification of the immediate topography.