Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.  Photos by Jefferson Smith

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Photos by Jefferson Smith

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.   

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.  Photos by Jefferson Smith

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Photos by Jefferson Smith

 Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.  Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.  The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.  By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.  Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.  Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.  Photos by Jefferson Smith

Our clients live in a 1930s house in Balham with their two young sons. One half of the couple had been raised in a modernist house in Belgium, surrounded by a collection of 20th Century Art while the other grew up in a mountainous region of Switzerland. Their sensibilities led them to give Liddicoat & Goldhill an open brief to adapt and expand their home, which had already been ‘opened up’ at ground floor level by previous architects.

Liddicoat & Goldhill’s response addressed the entire house, and was based on analysis of the family’s living patterns, and by making only the most economical structural changes. The interior layout was fully remodelled, with the most invasive and dramatic work happening at ground floor level and in the cramped circulation space, where an efficient and sinuous new staircase was added. Selective re-instatement of previously-demolished walls reinstated the formal drawing room, facing the street, while a stepped extension to the rear created an open plan eating, cooking and informal relaxation area.

The first floor was re-arranged to create a guest room, study and luxurious master suite with a meandering route from the sleeping area into the dressing and bathroom spaces.

By extending at roof level, we created two new children bedrooms suites. These were designed to overlap the different functions of sleeping, entertaining and studying. The rooms have large structural glazed windows with integrated desks affording panoramic views across SW London.

Aesthetically, the project has been conceived as a collage; a deliberate response to the vogue for monochromatic interiors. A rich mix of strongly-contrasting colours and textures creates a warmly tactile environment. In the kitchen, rough painted brickwork meets crisp plasterwork, black glass, stainless steel and strongly-grained wood. These provide the backdrop to carefully-chosen pieces of contemporary and mid-century Danish furniture, set against heated polished concrete floors.

Key to the design was the combination of the clients’ existing furniture and art with new purchases and pieces designed specially for the project. Liddicoat & Goldhill design and make furniture and objects - certain pieces were created specifically for the Janssens-Kobler house; the architects worked with specialists to fabricate these items. Particular noteworthy elements include the laser-cut timber ‘Corral’ lamp hanging over the dining table is designed and made by Liddicoat & Goldhill.

Photos by Jefferson Smith